Urban Mystic in 2021

Last year we really hit our stride with Season 2 of the Podcast of the Urban Mystic (link). This year we plan to continue the conversation about deconstruction and with those deconstructing. We’re currently in brainstorming mode deciding the best way for us to contribute to this broad and ongoing conversation. There are a number of deconstructors contributing meaningfully and yet we believe we offer a unique angle and make a valuable contribution.

One thing we really we want to do is dive deeper into the people’s stories. This conversation, that of deconstructing church, is one of the key conversations we believe to be worth having. Other conversations include the problem of God and relational spirituality.

Another thing we’re exploring is that of hosting an online seminar/conference with several contributors. We’re still in the early stages of planning and dreaming. This is something we’d love to do right but is our first step toward that. More news will follow. And if we don’t manage to navigate the tech hoops for an online seminar/conference we’re still going to be feature phenomenal deconstructors.

This year we’re looking to add more content not only to the podcast but also to YouTube. We only have a test video upon on our YouTube (link), but its there so that the channel is live. If you feel inspired (hint-hint-hint) we’d love you to follow the channel so long. We don’t want to put out content just for the sake of it, so will be experimenting toward excellent and meaningful content. So please be patient as we go through the hoops of learning to do video and editing it.

Bonus episodes end of Season 2

Garageband screenshot of my work-in-progress editing

When I started the podcast earlier in the year it was with a headset mic and somewhere in Season 2 I transitioned to the Rode Podcaster II with boom arm and PSM1 Shock Mount. I believe this is quite an upgrade in recording quality. The change meant that I had to learn to speak into a microphone. I also transitioned from using a PC to edit the podcast in Adobe Audition to a MacBook Pro and editing in Garageband. I much prefer the latter and recommend it to anyone starting out. Steve Carter crafted a jingle for the podcast and we began to use it in our intro and outro. At present the mysteries of EQ still elude me and I believe I’ve become a competent enough editor.

Nevertheless, arriving at the end of Season 2 is quite a personal and professional milestone. Season 2 includes a whopping 22 episodes!

Continue reading “Bonus episodes end of Season 2”

“I’ve seen him do things I can’t explain.”

The cover to The art of Mandalorian written by Phil Szostak and cover by Doug Chiang

“I’ve seen him do things I can’t explain.”

Din Jarin

These are the words spoken by Din Jarin to Ahsoka Tano about Grogu, an infant, in Season 2 Episode 5: The Jedi of The Mandalorian. Jarin is a Mandalorian and Bounty Hunter and Tano a former Jedi now renegade vigilante. Their commitment to the good that results in their landing as misfits within their socially and politically complex world. And it is this layering of themes such as fall and redemption, humanity and inhumanity, spirituality, stratification, and interaction between young and powerless and those capable that makes Star Wars* a complex and compelling universe to explore. The same can be said for Sci-Fi in general and we see similar themes in the likes of The Expanse**.

Continue reading ““I’ve seen him do things I can’t explain.””

Deconstructing with John Eliastam

Our guest two episodes is the visionary behind a national worship event called the Newsong Festival and planted the Newsong Vineyard Christian Fellowship which used to meet at the River Club in Observatory, Cape Town. Newsong was untypically progressive and successfully homed people in their 20s and 30s during a period where this demographic was unlikely to stay in church. He went on to pastor Kenilworth Vineyard Christian Fellowship untill 2010.

Join us for Part 1 and Part 2 of our conversation with John Eliastam.

Deconstructing with David Hayward

Our guest for this episode is the author of several books, hosts a number of courses, and creates a cartoon every day. He holds a Masters in Theological Studies, as well as Diploma in Religious Studies and Ministry, and University Teaching. His art expresses the stories and struggles of spiritual refugees and independent thinkers who question, doubt or oppose the confines of religion. Each piece encourages difficult conversations and acts as a catalyst for critical thinking. 

David Hayward is the NakedPastor. After 30 years in the church, he left the ministry to pursue his passion for art. His work challenges the status quo, deconstructs dogma, and promotes critical thinking.

Find out more on https://www.nakedpastorstore.com/.

Deconstructing with Brian D McLaren

Our guest for two episodes is an author of several books including “A new kind of Christianity”, “Faith after doubt”, “The secret message of Jesus”, and “The great spiritual migration”.

Brian D. McLaren is an author, speaker, activist, and public theologian. Brian is the author of several books including “A new kind of Christianity”, “Faith after doubt”, “The secret message of Jesus”, and “The great spiritual migration”. A former college English teacher and pastor, he is a passionate advocate for “a new kind of Christianity” – just, generous, and working with people for the common good.

Be sure to catch Episode 1 and Episode 2 on the podcast of the urban mystic.

Find out more on www.brianmclaren.net.

Season 2 – Emerging patterns

Photo by fauxels on Pexels.com

In Season 2 of the podcast of the urban mystic we feature phenomenal guests in order to get to know them and their journey. We use the same basic framework and a patterns naturally emerge. There are a lot of episodes so far with more to come. So far two cycles of deconstruction are well represented and we are about to begin the third. This makes it a good point to provide an orientation for those entering the conversation late. You may want to explore a particular kind of deconstruction and, if so, this kind of orientation will be helpful.

The series so far naturally evidences:

  1. Those who deconstruct their calling, reinvent their careers, and stay committed to the institution of the Church. Here the contributors insight into the institution and the problems therewith are not only insightful. You can, literally, hear their deep emotions as they reflect on their journey as professionals in ministry. They both recognise that their calling differs to their careers as professionals in ministry within the institution of the Church and go about redefining themselves. There is a real heartfelt tension between their career as template provided by the institution of the Church and their calling by God. Contributors include Christopher Harrison (link) and Dion Forster (part 1 and part 2).
  2. Those who deconstruct both their calling and the institution of the Church. This is a cycle that takes people through the deconstruction of their own calling and into deconstructing the machinery of the Church. Here they recognise the institution as denominational machinery and business machinery. And though we call this machinery “church” it is, in fact, not who the church is. And so they deconstruct their calling and the institution of the Church and offer alternatives. Richard Jacobson who best known for his thinking around unchurching, which mirror the concept of unschooling. Richard has long focused on stripping off the institutional dimension in order to focus on people in face-to-face community without the institutional and business machinery. Listen to his TED Talk (link) and the podcast (part 1 and part 2). John van de Laar is perhaps still best known as a Methodist minister, but has left the Church in order to explore community online for people leaving the church. John is at work building an online community. He recognises that genuine community takes place wherever people meet, including online. You can catch our conversation with him (part 1 and part 2).

Being the conversationalists we are, we continue our conversation in light of the conversations above. We pick up from our conversation with Chris and Dion to reflect on why we deconstructed our own calling (link). And we pick up on their shared critique of spirituality to deconstruct spirituality (link). We will be sharing our conversation following on from the second cycle of deconstruction next week.

Be sure to catch the upcoming episodes of the podcast of the urban mystic.

Deconstructing calling and spirituality

In episode 6 we deconstruct the notion of a calling and in episode 7 we deconstruct spirituality. This is a conversation between Steve Carter, my cohost, and myself. It is split into two parts. It was inspired by our conversations with Christopher Harrison and Dion Forster in Part 1 and Part 2. It was such a privilege to hear their stories and get to know them.

The first kind of deconstruction represented on the podcast of the urban mystic relates to the professional career in the ministry. Our first guest, Christopher Harrison, deconstructed his own career in ministry and now works as a missional coach enabling others to develop a broader, more creative and relevant approach to doing ministry. Our second guest, Dr. Dion Forster, likewise deconstructed his career in ministry and now serves as an academic for the church. Both conversations are richly layered with their experience in life and work.

Deconstructing with Dion Forster

Our guest for episode 3 and episode 4 is an academic for the church who holds two doctoral degrees – a PhD in Systematic Theology and a second PhD in New Testament Studies and Empirical Theology. He is the former Dean of John Wesley College, the seminary of the Methodist Church in South Africa. Dion now serves on the full time faculty of Stellenbosch University, as the Departmental Chair of the discipline of Systematic Theology and Ecclesiology, the Director of the Beyers Naude Centre for Public Theology, and as an Associate Professor in Systematic Theology and Ethics. 

His recent books are entitled “The (im)possibility of forgiveness?”, “Between Capital and Cathedral: Essays on Church and State relationships” (available here), “African public theology” (available here), and “Reconciliation, forgiveness and violence: biblical, pastoral and ethical perspectices” (available here). You can find out all about Dr. Dion Forster on http://dionforster.com/.

A snappy photo of Dion 🙂

Deconstructing with Christopher Harrison

Our guest for episode 1 is a retired Methodist Minister who now works as Missions Coordinator supporting churches to establish new forms of church for our changing culture and a missional coach enabling people to find new ways to grow disciples to make disciples. 

He is the director of Fresh Bread Ministries, Director of MyChurchIT (www.mychurchit.org), a minister in the Methodist Church of South Africa, an associate missionary with One Challenge Africa (www.ocafrica.net), a Mission Enabler with Fresh Africa (www.freshafrica.org.za) and a part-time lecturer in Church Planting in Contemporary Context with the Department of Religious Studies in the Faculty of Theology in the University of Pretoria.

Find out more about Christopher Harrison at https://www.facebook.com/freshbreadministriessouthafrica/.